Tai Chi

Tai chi, which originated in China as a martial art, is a mind-body practice, sometimes referred to as ''moving meditation''. Practitioners move their bodies slowly, gently, and with awareness, while breathing deeply. Tai chi incorporates the Chinese concepts of yin and yang and qi (a vital energy or life force). Practicing tai chi is said to support a healthy balance of yin and yang, thereby aiding the flow of qi. 

There is no governing body or set standards or credentials for Tai Chi Instructors; there are numerous training programs and masters to study with, who have different styles and lineages. The American Tai Chi and Qigong Association (ATCQA) provides independent Tai Chi accreditation; their Certification is not affiliated with any particular school, program, style or lineage. They offer 3 Certification Levels for Tai Chi Instructor, ranging from Level I with at least 150 documented hours in formal Tai Chi training and at least 500 hours of experience in teaching, to Level III, requiring at least 2000 hours of experience in teaching Tai Chi.

Tai Chi

Tai Chi

T’ai Chi Ch’uan (or Tai Chi) originated in China, and includes is a series of slow, fluid, purposeful, physical movements with controlled breathing and relaxation. These movements have been shown to improve strength, flexibility, and balance while focusing the mind and improving clarity. Research suggests that Tai Chi has positive effects on quality of life, heart and brain functions, and reduced fall risk in older people.

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